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Continuation of the topic regarding the superiority of Europeans and the delusions of communists

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On 1/23/2018 at 3:10 PM, Gabranth said:

People nowadays do a lot of thinking and not a lot of doing

Well, surely that's much better than if people were doing a lot of doing without thinking beforehand, no?

Not that they do as much of either as I'd like :(

Edited by Sir Scarfalot
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It should be noted that the tradition of fascism comes from the old Roman Republic and starts off as commendable. The term fascism comes from the Latin word fasces, meaning a bundle of sticks that were carried around by the lictores, a form of ceremonial secret service for the Roman consuls. Within the pomerium, or the sacred circle of Rome, the lictores would carry the fasces and beat the shit out of people to whom the consul deemed in need of judgement. When the consul was outside of the pomerium, his lictores would carry an axe within the bundle of sticks (thus, the symbol of fascism), signifying that the consul had the power of life and death over Roman citizens while at war.

This is even more pronounced in the dictator, who was elected by the Senate to choose an ex-consul to lead. The most famous story is of the first dictator, Cincinnatus. Most historians debate when Cincinnatus came to power, or indeed if he was a real person in the first place. But most can agree that the his legend is one that inspires the true nature of dictatorship. In a conflict with a neighboring tribe, both elected consuls of Rome led armies into the field, and were surrounded on a mountain top some 40 miles from Rome. In desperation, the senate sought Cincinnatus, a disgraced ex-consul, to become the first Roman dictator. As dictator, Cincinnatus' lictores carried axes in their fasces within the pomerium, meaning that even within the sacred circle of Rome, Cincinnatus could execute citizens should he deem it necessary. This came out of a necessity during times of war, in the recognition that real existential peril does necessitate power and unity. Futhermore, he was given the power to call upon a double consular army to lift the siege of the contemporary consuls. Cincinnatus raised his legion, lifted the siege, and returned to Rome in triumph in a little over a week. He then resigned his dictatorship, and returned to his farm. In his lifetime, Cincinnatus was called upon a second time to serve as dictator, and again resigned his dictatorship immediately after the threat of destruction had passed. 

Even Sulla, the first man to march an armed legion into the pomerium of Rome for the purpose of killing his political enemies, decided to resign his dictatorship 10 years later when he deemed the threat of the populists had subsided. The true collapse of the Republic came with Julius Caesar, who thought that Sulla (and every dictator before him) was stupid for leaving their office, and later proclaimed himself dictator in perpetuum. 

 

The ultimate difference between a Republican-style of dictatorship and 20th century fascism is that the axe in the fasces was a temporary adornment in the Republic and a permanent annex in the Axis powers. Thus, in all democratic states, the axe must be justified by presenting every enemy - real or fabricated - to be an existential threat. Arguably, the difference is also the quality of leadership; Great men wield power to squash enemies and govern a state, but even greater men step away from power to preserve the longevity of the republic. Again, another difference between fascism and American democracy is here: Washington surrendered power to return to his farm, despite the people willing to give him power to "protect the republic." If that sounds familiar, there is a reason why the historical group which preserves Washington's memory is called the Society of Cincinnati. 

 

So yes, technically, American democracy does have a tradition of "fascism," but it would hardly look like the 20th century bullshit everyone thinks of when they hear the term. 

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On 1/26/2018 at 4:49 PM, Caecus said:

Take any superhero movie: when space aliens invade earth, they take over a hospital. Because aliens are the ultimate evil, it is justified to destroy the hospital and innocent people in there so long as the evil is destroyed.

What film have you been seeing?

16 hours ago, Caecus said:

So yes, technically, American democracy does have a tradition of "fascism," but it would hardly look like the 20th century bullshit everyone thinks of when they hear the term. 

Facism of those days is different to the Fascism of these days

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55 minutes ago, Haris said:

What film have you been seeing?

Facism of those days is different to the Fascism of these days

Take Man of Steel (2013) for example. In the climax of the movie, Superman fights alien demigod in downtown metropolis, and in the process, levels buildings with presumably hundreds of people inside. Yet, superman is not charged with the mass murder his fight creates (not that it could be done in the first place, but that's besides the point). Not only is he not charged, but nobody sheds tears about all the people that died because of his fight. Why? Because Superman was saving them from the real great evil that would have destroyed the planet. 

I'm not sure what you are trying to say here. Are you trying to say that 20th century fascism is different from fascism today? Are you trying to say what I've already said, which is that "fascism" of the Republic is different from 20th century fascism? I don't understand the comment here. 

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